Picture
In previous studies, we investigated if distance to a supermarket was associated with a child’s BMI or weight status. However, these studies only measured one point in time, and we wanted to know if children participating in an obesity intervention who lived closer to a supermarket would do better than those living farther away. Our findings from this study were recently published in the American Journal of Public Health.

 
 
Picture





by Wei Perng, PhD


We’ve all heard why eating non-organic animal products is a bad idea: the animals may be raised in poor conditions, industrial agriculture produces large amounts of air and water pollution, it’s a leading cause of deforestation in the U.S., and the animals may be fed antibiotics.

 
 
Picture




by Wei Perng, PhD


As evidenced by our previous blog posts on food allergies, it is clear that allergic diseases, which include food allergies as well as atopic dermatitis (eczema) and allergic rhinitis (hay fever), are on the rise – especially in developed countries. Given the improvements in health care and sanitation in recent decades, why would this be?

 
 
Picture




by Avik Chatterjee, MD, MPH


A few weeks ago in Toronto, I had the pleasure of hearing my colleague Seth Berkowitz, a talented young researcher at MGH, present a project. His presentation was clear, his research methods thoughtful and his analysis impeccable. But after his talk, rather than praise, he got push-back. Why?
Because his findings challenged a popular theory for socioeconomic differences in healthy food access, obesity and diabetes; he found that living in a food desert does not affect individuals’ control over their diabetes.